Water City Orchestra

THE CHAINSTORE WAS TRANSFORMED BY RIVER RUN EXHIBITION, A SIMILAR INSTALLATION WILL BE CREATED FOR THE ORCHESTRA IN A WEEKEND EVENT

To Date, 200 ARTISTS AND CHILDREN have been involved in making and exhibiting visual arts works as part of the Water City Festival

Artists , Artist’s groups and organisations who have been involved to date in the visual arts:-

Arteast, disability Enterprise, 20 people

Signs of Life, Mural Project, 20 people

Neha Malik, Painter

Caroline Holden-Hotopf, Artist/Cartoonist

Theo Creber, Photographer

Mark O’Rourke, Painter

Ann-Marie Fairbrother, Artist

Kole Onilere, Film maker

Ian Moore, Designer

Nick Creber, Artist

Laura Williams, Artist

Joao Wrobel, Architect

Designers and Architects at Leaside Regeneration, Regeneration Company

Eva Bachmann, Photogrpher/Painter

Maria Alvarez-Echenique, Ceramic Sculptor

Paula Haughney, Sculptor

Murude Leong, Ceramic Artist

Chris Warmington, Artist

Lydia Gardner, Painter

Soren Meyes, Painter

Sam March, Painter

Alexander Blake, Painter

James trimmer, Painter

Chris Wheeler, Painter

Marguerite Creber, Painter

Ben Smithers, Painter/Graphic Artist

Yvonne Coughlan, Artist

Faraday Nursery School, 24 children

Marner after-school club, 12 children

Marner School, yrs 5+6, 60 children

River Run workshops 30 children

A BIT OF HISTORY ABOUT THE CHAINSTORE

Follow this link from

SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN SUPPLEMENT NO. 470

NEW YORK, JANUARY 3, 1885

for interesting facts about how Whistling and bell buoys work. These buoys are still in use today.

Background information about Trinity Buoy Wharf

Henry VIII gave the forerunner of the Corporation of Trinity House a royal charter in 1514 and it received a coat of arms in 1573 along with the authority to create beacons and signs “for the better navigation of the coasts of England”.

Since then it has pioneered the techniques of lighthouses and signage often worked at its Thames side workshop at Trinity Buoy Wharf established in 1803.

At first wooden buoys and sea marks were made and stored there and a mooring provided for the Trinity House yacht which laid the buoys.

The river wall along the Lea was rebuilt in brick in 1822 and this is the oldest surviving structure on the site.

The iconic experimental lighthouse was built in 1864 along with the chain and buoy store and expansion meant that by 1910 it was a major local employer of tradesmen such as platers, blacksmiths, riveters, painters and chain testers.

Modernised between 1947 and 1966, it finally closed on December 3, 1988, when it was taken over by the London Docklands Development Corporation.

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